Collective Bargaining Agreement Approved

The CBA, agreed in 1993, was extended in 1998 by the agreement of the players and owners. The agreement improved players` performance by introducing a new severance package, increasing players` minimum wages during all years of service, and adding new medical rights for players. The agreement also included a revised season plan for 1982, which had a nine-game regular season and a new playoff format that allowed 16 of the league`s 28 teams to qualify for the playoffs. [1] In addition, the agreement contained a guarantee from the owners that players would receive a total of at least $1.6 billion in salaries and social benefits over the five-year period of the new agreement. [7] There`s a lot to unpack here, but we`ve dealt with the CBA negotiations from day one, so you can read all of our CBA-related contributions by clicking on the “Collective Agreement” day at the end of this article to see exactly what this agreement means for the league. However, we would be remiss if we did not highlight a few highlights: the currently active agreement was ratified in 2020 and covers the 2030 season and involves changes in the distribution of the league`s revenues, player earnings and improvements in health and safety, finally the increase of the regular season to 17 games played and the raising of the active limits of managers and training frameworks. In 1968, the National League Players Association was first recognized in writing by the owners of the National Football League team. . . .